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Use of a collagen-platelet rich plasma scaffold to stimulate healing of a central defect in the canine ACL Long Island *

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee fails to heal after primary repair. Here we hypothesize that a beneficial biologic repair response can be induced by placing a collagen-platelet rich plasma (collagen-PRP) material into a central ACL defect. A collagen-PRP scaffold was used to treat a central ACL defect in vivo. In the first experiment, the histologic response in treated and untreated defects was evaluated at 3 (n = 5) and 6 weeks (n = 5). In the second experiment, biomechanical testing of the treated ligaments (n = 8) was performed at 6 weeks and compared with the results of biomechanical testing of untreated defects at the same time-point (n = 6).

The percentage filling of the defects in the treated ACLs was significantly higher at both the 3- and 6-week time-points when compared with the untreated contralateral control defects (50 ± 21% vs. 2 ± 2% at 3 weeks, and 43 ± 11% vs. 23 ± 11 at 6 weeks; all values mean ± SEM. Biomechanically, the treated ACL defects had a 40% increase in strength at 6 weeks, which was significantly higher than the 14% increase in strength previously reported for untreated defects (p < 0.02). Placement of a collagen-PRP bridging scaffold in a central ACL defect can stimulate healing of the ACL histologically and biomechanically. © 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 24:820-830, 2006

* Legal Disclaimer: Chelation and Hyperbaric Therapy, Stem Cell Therapy, and other treatments and modalities mentioned or referred to in this web site are medical techniques that may or may not be considered “mainstream”. As with any medical treatment, results will vary among individuals, and there is no implication or guarantee that you will heal or achieve the same outcome as patients herein.

As with any procedure, there could be pain or other substantial risks involved. These concerns should be discussed with your health care provider prior to any treatment so that you have proper informed consent and understand that there are no guarantees to healing.

THE INFORMATION IN THIS WEBSITE IS OFFERED FOR GENERAL EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT IMPLY OR GIVE MEDICAL ADVICE. No Doctor/Patient relationship shall be deemed to have arisen simply by reading the information contained on these pages, and you should consult with your personal physician/care giver regarding your medical treatment before undergoing any sort of treatment or therapy.

Published on 05-27-2009
Authors: Martha M. Murray 1 *, Kurt P. Spindler 2, Clint Devin 2, Brian S. Snyder 3, John Muller 3, Masaya Takahashi 3, Percy Ballard 1 2, Lillian B. Nanney 4, David Zurakowski 1
Source: Journal of Orthopaedic Research Volume 24 Issue 4, Pages 820 - 830