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Stem cell therapy for peripheral arterial disease *

Background
Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common cause of disability and mortality. Up to one third of patients are not susceptible to traditional revascularization and may benefit from stem cell therapies.

Objective
In this meta-analysis, we sought to determine whether autologous cell therapy is effective in the treatment of PAD.

Methods
We searched the English literature in Medline, Excerpta Medica and the Cochrane database for trials of autologous cell therapy in patients with PAD published before 31 January 2009. We included controlled and non-controlled, randomized and non-randomized trials using autologous bone marrow or granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized peripheral blood cells to treat PAD. We also collected data from trials of G-CSF monotherapy, as a control treatment.

Results
In a meta-analysis of 37 trials, autologous cell therapy was effective in improving surrogate indexes of ischemia, subjective symptoms and hard endpoints (ulcer healing and amputation). On the contrary, G-CSF monotherapy was not associated with significant improvement in the same endpoints. Patients with thromboangiitis obliterans showed some larger benefits than patients with atherosclerotic PAD. The intramuscular route of administration and the use of bone marrow cells seemed somehow more effective than intrarterial administration and the use of mobilized peripheral blood cells. The procedures were well tolerated and generally safe.

Conclusion
This meta-analysis indicates that intramuscular autologous bone marrow cell therapy is a feasible, relatively safe and potentially effective therapeutic strategy for PAD patients, who are not candidate for traditional revascularization. Larger, placebo-controlled, randomized multicenter trials need to be planned and conducted to confirm these findings.

* Legal Disclaimer: Chelation and Hyperbaric Therapy, Stem Cell Therapy, and other treatments and modalities mentioned or referred to in this web site are medical techniques that may or may not be considered “mainstream”. As with any medical treatment, results will vary among individuals, and there is no implication or guarantee that you will heal or achieve the same outcome as patients herein.

As with any procedure, there could be pain or other substantial risks involved. These concerns should be discussed with your health care provider prior to any treatment so that you have proper informed consent and understand that there are no guarantees to healing.

THE INFORMATION IN THIS WEBSITE IS OFFERED FOR GENERAL EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT IMPLY OR GIVE MEDICAL ADVICE. No Doctor/Patient relationship shall be deemed to have arisen simply by reading the information contained on these pages, and you should consult with your personal physician/care giver regarding your medical treatment before undergoing any sort of treatment or therapy.

Published on 09-01-2016
Authors: Gian Paolo Fadini, Carlo Agostini, Angelo Avogaro
Source: Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Padova, Medical School, Padova, Italy

Comments by Dr. Calapai


A large multi center meta analysis describes the benefits of your own stem cells for peripheral vascular disease. Bone marrow stem cells were used and injected into muscles and intravenously.

Posted on 2016-09-01 09:54:25

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