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Phase I trial: the use of autologous cultured adipose-derived stroma/stem cells to treat patients with non-revascularizable critical limb ischemia *

Background aims

Non-revascularizable critical limb ischemia (CLI) is the most severe stage of peripheral arterial disease, with no therapeutic option. Extensive preclinical studies have demonstrated that adipose-derived stroma cell (ASC) transplantation strongly improves revascularization and tissue perfusion in ischemic limbs. This study, named ACellDREAM, is the first phase I trial to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intramuscular injections of autologous ASC in non-revascularizable CLI patients.

Methods

Seven patients were consecutively enrolled, on the basis of the following criteria: (i) lower-limb rest pain or ulcer; (ii) ankle systolic oxygen pressure <50 or 70 mm Hg for non-diabetic and diabetic patients, respectively, or first-toe systolic oxygen pressure <30 mm Hg or 50 mm Hg for non-diabetic and diabetic patients, respectively; (iii) not suitable for revascularization. ASCs from abdominal fat were grown for 2 weeks and were then characterized.

Results

More than 200 million cells were obtained, with almost total homogeneity and no karyotype abnormality. The expressions of stemness markers Oct4 and Nanog were very low, whereas expression of telomerase was undetectable in human ASCs compared with human embryonic stem cells. ASCs (108) were then intramuscularly injected into the ischemic leg of patients, with no complication, as judged by an independent committee. Trans-cutaneous oxygen pressure tended to increase in most patients. Ulcer evolution and wound healing showed improvement.

Conclusions

These data demonstrate the feasibility and safety of autologous ASC transplantation in patients with objectively proven CLI not suitable for revascularization. The improved wound healing also supports a putative functional efficiency.

URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1465324913007846

* Legal Disclaimer: Chelation and Hyperbaric Therapy, Stem Cell Therapy, and other treatments and modalities mentioned or referred to in this web site are medical techniques that may or may not be considered “mainstream”. As with any medical treatment, results will vary among individuals, and there is no implication or guarantee that you will heal or achieve the same outcome as patients herein.

As with any procedure, there could be pain or other substantial risks involved. These concerns should be discussed with your health care provider prior to any treatment so that you have proper informed consent and understand that there are no guarantees to healing.

THE INFORMATION IN THIS WEBSITE IS OFFERED FOR GENERAL EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT IMPLY OR GIVE MEDICAL ADVICE. No Doctor/Patient relationship shall be deemed to have arisen simply by reading the information contained on these pages, and you should consult with your personal physician/care giver regarding your medical treatment before undergoing any sort of treatment or therapy.

Published on 12-17-2014