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Smoking-Induced Monocyte Dysfunction Is Reversed by Vitamin C Supplementation In Vivo

Objective— The role of antioxidants in preventing vascular disease remains controversial. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is important for endothelial and monocyte function. This study investigated the negative effects of smoking on monocyte migratory responsiveness to VEGF-A and the usefulness of vitamin C to prevent smoking-induced monocyte dysfunction.
 
Methods and Results— The chemotactic response of isolated monocytes from a cohort of 17 non-smokers and 10 smokers toward VEGF-A was assessed. VEGF-A significantly stimulated the migration of monocytes in non-smokers; the monocytes from smokers failed to respond to VEGF-A. Repeated analysis after 2 weeks of vitamin C intake (2g/d) showed a fully restored VEGF-A-induced monocyte migration in smokers. VEGF-A serum levels were not altered by vitamin C. VEGF-A-inducible kinase activity was intact in monocytes from smokers as assessed by in vitro kinase assay. Monocyte dysfunction can be mimicked in vitro by challenging monocytes with a range of reactive oxygen species (ROS).
 
Conclusions— Stimulation of monocyte migration by VEGF-A was severely attenuated in smokers, and the deficit observed was surmounted by vitamin C supplementation. The negative effects of smoking on monocyte function may translate into adverse impacts on VEGF-A-dependent repair processes such as arteriogenesis. These results propose a causative role of oxidative stress in smoking-induced monocyte dysfunction.
 
This study investigated the negative effects of smoking on monocyte migratory responsiveness to VEGF-A and the usefulness of vitamin C to prevent smoking-induced monocyte dysfunction. Stimulation of monocyte migration by VEGF-A was severely attenuated in smokers, and the deficit observed was surmounted by vitamin C supplementation. The negative effects of smoking on monocyte function may translate into adverse impacts on VEGF-A-dependent repair processes such as arteriogenesis. These results propose a causative role of oxidative stress in smoking-induced monocyte dysfunction.
 
 
Published on 08-18-2008
Authors: Nadina Stadler; Juliane Eggermann; Stefan Voo; Andrea Kranz; Johannes Waltenberger
Source: From the Department of Cardiology (N.S., S.V., J.W.),, University of Maastricht, Cardiovascular Research Institute of Maastricht (CARIM),, The Netherlands; and the Department of Internal Medicine II (J.E., A.K., J.W.),, Ulm University Medical Center, Ulm, Germany.