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Autologous stem cell transplantation for progressive multiple sclerosis: Update of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation autoimmune diseases working party database


Over the last decade, hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT) has been increasingly used in the treatment of severe progressive autoimmune diseases. We report a retrospective survey of 183 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, recorded in the database of the European Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group (EBMT). Transplant data were available from 178 patients who received an autologous graft. Overall, transplant related mortality (TRM) was 5.3% and was restricted to the period 1995-2000, with no further TRM…

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Autologous non-myeloablative haemopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a phase I/II study


Background Autologous non-myeloablative haemopoietic stem cell transplantation is a method to deliver intense immune suppression. We evaluated the safety and clinical outcome of autologous non-myeloablative haemopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) who had not responded to treatment with interferon beta. Methods Eligible patients had relapsing-remitting MS, attended Northwestern Memorial Hospital, and despite treatment with interferon beta had had two corticosteroid-treated relapses within the previous 12 months, or one relapse and…

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Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis—An Interim Analysis of Efficacy


Based on the good results of experimental transplantation in animal models of multiple sclerosis and of other autoimmune diseases, we have treated 24 patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis with high-dose chemotherapy (BEAM regimen) followed by autologous blood stem cell rescue and antithymocyte globulin. Blood stem cells were mobilised with cyclophosphamide at 4g/m2 and G- (or GM-) CSF. In 9 cases, additional CD34+ cell-selection of the graft was performed. Here we update previously published…

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Autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation induce VEGF and neovascularization in ischemic myocardium


Neovascularization induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) represents an appealing approach for treating ischemic heart disease. However, VEGF therapy has been associated with transient therapeutic effects and potential risk for hemangioma growth. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow are a promising source for tissue regeneration and repair. In order to achieve a safe and persistent angiogenic effect, we have explored the potential of autologous MSCs transplantation to enhance angiogenesis and cardiac…

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Olfactory Mucosa Is a Potential Source for Autologous Stem Cell Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease


Parkinson’s disease is a complex disorder characterized by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the brain. Stem cell transplantation is aimed at replacing dopaminergic neurons because the most successful drug therapies affect these neurons and their synaptic targets. We show here that neural progenitors can be grown from the olfactory organ of humans, including those with Parkinson’s disease. These neural progenitors proliferated and generated dopaminergic cells in vitro. They also generated dopaminergic…

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Stem-cell therapy for cardiac disease


Heart failure is the leading cause of death worldwide, and current therapies only delay progression of the disease. Laboratory experiments and recent clinical trials suggest that cell-based therapies can improve cardiac function, and the implications of this for cardiac regeneration are causing great excitement. Bone-marrow-derived progenitor cells and other progenitor cells can differentiate into vascular cell types, restoring blood flow. More recently, resident cardiac stem cells have been shown to differentiate into multiple cell types…

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Stem cell therapy in a caprine model of osteoarthritis


Objective To explore the role that implanted mesenchymal stem cells may play in tissue repair or regeneration of the injured joint, by delivery of an autologous preparation of stem cells to caprine knee joints following induction of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Adult stem cells were isolated from caprine bone marrow, expanded in culture, and transduced to express green fluorescent protein. OA was induced unilaterally in the knee joint of donor animals by complete excision of the…

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Autologous stem cell therapy for peripheral arterial disease


Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common cause of disability and mortality. Up to one third of patients are not susceptible to traditional revascularization and may benefit from stem cell therapies. Objective In this meta-analysis, we sought to determine whether autologous cell therapy is effective in the treatment of PAD. Methods We searched the English literature in Medline, Excerpta Medica and the Cochrane database for trials of autologous cell therapy in patients with PAD…

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Autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in stroke patients


Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation improves recovery from ischemic stroke in animals. We examined the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of cell therapy using culture-expanded autologous MSCs in patients with ischemic stroke. We prospectively and randomly allocated 30 patients with cerebral infarcts within the middle cerebral arterial territory and with severe neurological deficits into one of two treatment groups: the MSC group (n = 5) received intravenous infusion of 1 × 108 autologous MSCs, whereas the…

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Autologous bone-marrow stem-cell transplantation for myocardial regeneration


Implantation of bone-marrow stem cells in the heart might be a new method to restore tissue viability after myocardial infarction. We injected up to 1.5×106 autologous AC133+ bone-marrow cells into the infarct border zone in six patients who had had a myocardial infarction and undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. 3—9 months after surgery, all patients were alive and well, global left-ventricular function was enhanced in four patients, and infarct tissue perfusion had improved strikingly in…

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